Monday, November 02, 2015

More fungi...

On holiday today, with thick fog on the coast I headed a short way inland to Shepherds Law to check out some waxcap grassland.

There were quite a few out but I still struggle with the identification...

Waxcap grassland
 I've never been to this spot before, but read that it was good for grass land fungi so gave it a try. It was excellent. To allow most waxcap species to grow the grass must not have artificial fertilisers for more than 50 years! Is it any wonder they are so rare...

The list is as follows -

Meadow Waxcap Hygrocype pratensis many
Scarlet Waxcap H. coccinea
Crimson Waxcap H.punicea
Golden Waxcap H. chlorophana
Heath or Honey Waxcap H. laeta or H. reidii
Snowy Waxcap H. virginea many
poss Blackening Waxcap H. conica


This isnt a waxcap....

Possible Blackening Waxcap? It was yellowish green and seemed 'burnt'.

Crimson Waxcaps. New for me.

Are these Heath Waxcap or Honey Waxcap?

Scarlet Waxcap

I thought this might be Fibrous Waxcap, but now think its more likely to be a mature Crimson...


6 comments:

Johnnykinson said...

No wonder you enjoy your fungi.............nearly as difficult as moths, i would have thought !

Stewart said...

Lots more difficult that moths John. Once a moth is a moth, thats it, but fungi start off small and closed then grow taller and open and then begin to rot, all the while changing shape and colour etc! I am no further forward after years of mlooking. I'm fungi-lexic....

Ragged Robin said...

Not good at fungi id either Stewart but those photos and waxcaps are amazing. Wish I could find somewhere round here where I could find some - have thought of looking in churchyards. Well done on finding so many :)

Stewart said...

Hi Caroline, yes try Churchyards and Stately Homes. Any grassland with moss in it that has not had any artificial fertilisers or chemicals for 50 years at least! No wonder they're hard to find...

amanda peters said...

What a stunning place and the colours are so bright, did have a go one year at ID fungi, like you said it is such a hard subject as they can change so much as they grow and die. With all this damp weather it should be a good year, perhaps I might have another go !
Amanda xx

David Turner said...

Beautiful fungi Stewart and a great find :-) Since East Yorkshire is dominated by arable farming we have very few places where waxcaps can be found down here but there is a precious SSSI high on the Yorkshire Wolds where I go every year to enjoy these stunning beauties. I never tire of them :-)