Sunday, March 20, 2011

What to Look for in Spring...



...goes the title of the ladybird book first published in 1961. I had all of the 'seasons' series, beautifully illustrated by Charles Tunnicliffe. They were very evocative of halcyon days out in the field, before all people cared about was their XBox, OK magazine, Big Brother, Bankers Bonuses, Cuts, Libya and Stejnegers Scoters. I loved them.

Toady up at Branton Pits doing the count with Mr Rutter, was just like the Spring one.

A pair of Great Crested Grebes were keeping close, while Coots were territorial and the Reed Buntings looked lost as they had just returned to look for a place to call home.

Sallows bloomed around the margins, just waiting some warm sunshine to get the bees and moths to pollinate...


A Chiffchaff was in full song between flycatching sorties, and a Redwing looked ready to have a sing before heading north.



The Black headed Gull colony was starting to crowd up while down at the river, the Dippers were in full breeding fettle..


Sigh...

[Oh and I forgot to add a proper patch tick this morning. A single Red legged Partridge was along the lane end.]

5 comments:

Phil said...

I was given What to Look for in Winter for my 10th. birthday (50 years ago) by my grandmother and collected all four - and still have them. They helped to hook me on natural history (along with Brook Bond tea cards). Still got those too....

Matteo Grilli said...

Beautiful!

Birding Ecosse said...

Good way to start a Monday, cup of coffee and a wander down memeory lane... sadly I no longer have the books but off to ebay/amazon just in case!

Warren Baker said...

Hi Stewart,
I had Ladybird books! Birds of Sea and Esuary, Garden Birds, heath and Woodland Birds, was there one called Pond and river birds too ? :-) Cool books!

Jack Ashton-Booth said...

Thats brilliant, I was thinking of piecing together some of the early art from the ladybird books on my blog and then came across this post. I just think the work is outstanding and the illustrators clearly understood every aspect of nature.....and then there's Tunnicliffe! a magician

Great Stuff Stewart and love your work